2013 AFP International Conference on Fundraising [Preview]

AFP 2013 International Conference

Before I register for the AFP International Conference the first thing I consider is, “what do I hope to gain from this trip?” You see, for me this annual conference is more than a smorgasbord of best practice examples and how-tos. I view the conference as a way to recharge my batteries, renew my resolve, […]

4 Problems With Giving Tuesday & How to Address Them

Address these four issues for your organization so you can rise above the noise of Giving Tuesday, and make the donor experience necessary, memorable, sustainable, and impactful. The four problems with Giving Tuesday are that:
1) Many nonprofits don’t offer any extra incentive for donors to act compared to any other day,
2) Outside of the actual donation, non-profit requests don’t make meaningful linkages back to the season of giving,
3) Aside from increasing requests and leveraging the increased attention, organizations don’t make it any easier to take action compared to other days,
4) Unlike Black Friday “doorbusters” and Cyber Monday “coupon codes,” Giving Tuesday gifts will not have any more impact than normal.

Thoughts on Future and Current Board Members

books

If you want to encourage a board culture that seeks out authoritative sources to help inform their governance role, you may want to consider giving a board member an article, blog post, or book (either physically, or on loan through an e-reader). Ask them to summarize the text at a future meeting. Here are some recommended resources….

2011 AFP NC Philanthropy Conference

AFP NC Philanthropy Conference

This entry provides links to presentation materials referenced during my August 11, 2011 session at the 7th Annual AFP NC Philanthropy Conference in Durham, North Carolina. My session, International Perspectives to Inform Our Best Practices, explores the context for philanthropy and charity for international cultures such as those in Africa, Asia and Latin America and helps us reconsider our best practice models in light of a diverse perspective.

Fundraising Ethics and Corporate Scholarships

“Each scholarship recipient selected by the University may be given an opportunity to intern at XYZ Corp, depending on mutual need and consent.”

Having worked in higher education my entire career I appreciated the way in which this statement was worded. It indicated to students that the company would like to consider scholarship recipients for an internship, but the company understood that the scholarship award was not contingent on the students’ acceptance of an internship and the University was ultimately responsible for selecting the recipient.